How to Find Your Wells Fargo Routing Number

As one of the largest banks in the United States, Wells Fargo has over 13,000 ATMs and 5,400 retail banking locations across the country.

If you’ve moved around a lot and still have a Wells Fargo account, it can get tricky to find your routing number. You might need it to set up a direct deposit, get a paycheck deposited, transfer funds, or any number of financial tasks. It can be a pain to look it up but not today.

If you’re looking for your Wells Fargo routing number, we can help you find it.

There are three easy ways you can find it:

  • Look up your routing number by state
  • Look for your routing number on your personal checks, if you have one available
  • Call Wells Fargo customer service and ask them for your routing number

Let’s dive right in:

Table of Contents
  1. Wells Fargo Routing Number by State
    1. Why are there so many Wells Fargo routing numbers?
  2. Finding the Routing Number on Your Check
  3. Contact Wells Fargo for Your Number
  4. Different Routing Number for Wire Transfers

Wells Fargo Routing Number by State

Your Wells Fargo ABA routing number will be based on the state in which you opened your account, just look for it on the table below and you’re done.

StateABA Routing Number
Alabama062000080
Alaska125200057
Arizona122105278
Arkansas111900659
California121042882
Colorado102000076
Connecticut021101108
Delaware031100869
Florida063107513
Georgia061000227
Hawaii121042882
Idaho124103799
Illinois071101307
Indiana074900275
Iowa073000228
Kansas101089292
Kentucky121042882
Louisiana121042882
Maine121042882
Maryland055003201
Massachusetts121042882
Michigan091101455
Minnesota091000019
Mississippi062203751
Missouri113105449
Montana092905278
Nebraska104000058
Nevada321270742
New Hampshire121042882
New Jersey021200025
New Mexico107002192
New York026012881
North Carolina053000219
North Dakota091300010
Ohio041215537
Oklahoma121042882
Oregon123006800
Pennsylvania031000503
Rhode Island121042882
South Carolina053207766
South Dakota091400046
Tennessee064003768
Texas111900659
Texas – El Paso112000066
Utah124002971
Vermont121042882
Virginia051400549
Washington125008547
Washington, D.C.054001220
West Virginia121042882
Wisconsin075911988
Wyoming102301092

Why are there so many Wells Fargo routing numbers?

Ever wonder why some banks have so many routing numbers? It’s because they’ve merged and acquired smaller banks, keeping their financial infrastructure in place, and just building on top of it. Wells Fargo & Company was founded mid-1800s so they’ve had quite a bit of time to acquire other banks over the years.

You’ll notice in the list that many states have the same ABA routing number. Those were all one bank (or at least one bank at the time they were acquired) before Wells Fargo brought them into the fold. It’s fun to see the relationships of banks because you can often tie them back to their ABA routing number.

Finding the Routing Number on Your Check

If you have a personal check handy, your routing number is located on the check itself. This is why most HR departments request a voided check to set up your direct deposit. They want to be able to read it from the check itself, avoiding any lost-in-translation situations in case you write it down wrong.

The nine-digit number highlighted in red is the number you want to use. The green number, which is often longer, is your account number. The ABA routing number is always a nine-digit number and you can confirm the number with the table above or use the American Bankers Association Routing Number lookup tool to confirm.

What’s fun is that you can confirm the validity of any ABA routing number’s formatting with just the number itself. The first four digits correspond to the Federal Reserve Routing Symbol, the next four digits are the ABAB institution identifier, and the last digit is a check digit.

If you look at the California routing number (121042882) – the first four digits are for the Federal Reserve Routing Symbol. The 12 is for San Francisco. I won’t get into super detail about the rest but I think it’s kind of fun to see.

Contact Wells Fargo for Your Number

There are two ways you can ask Wells Fargo, the first is through a form on their website. It will ask you for your account type and state to determine your routing number. We pulled the numbers in the above table from this tool.

If you don’t recall which state you were in when you first opened the account and you don’t have a check, you can call Wells Fargo to ask a customer service representative for your ABA routing number.

The phone number is 1-800-869-3557 and they are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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Different Routing Number for Wire Transfers

The ABA routing numbers are useful only for ACH transfers. If you are receiving a wire transfer, then the code will be different – fortunately, it’s a simpler system with one number for domestic wire transfers and one for international wire transfers.

Wire transfers are “better” than an ACH transfer because they’re faster by a few days – they’re also more expensive. An ACH transfer is free, an incoming wire transfer costs $15 and an outgoing transfer costs $30.

  • Domestic wire transfer (Wire Routing Transit Number) – 121000248
  • International wire transfer (SWIFT/BIC Code) – WFBIUS6S

If you’re receiving a wire transfer, here’s the other information you may need to provide:

Bank NameWells Fargo Bank, N.A.
Bank Address420 Montgomery
San Francisco, CA 94104
(regardless of where your account is located)
BNF/Field 4200
Beneficiary acct. #
Your complete Wells Fargo account number
including leading zeros
Beneficiary
account name
and address
The name and address of your account as it
appears on your statement
CHIPS Participant0407

If you’re going to send a wire transfer, confirm all the details before you send it. In almost all cases, wire transfers cannot be reversed. Always talk to the person you’re going to wire transfer, double-check the details, and confirm them. I’ve heard of a lot of scams that are the result of erroneous wire transfers.

There you go – pretty easy right?

 

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Jim Wang

About Jim Wang

Jim Wang is a thirty-something father of three who is a frequent contributor to Forbes and Vanguard's Blog. He has also been fortunate to have appeared in the New York Times, Baltimore Sun, Entrepreneur, and Marketplace Money.

Jim has a B.S. in Computer Science and Economics from Carnegie Mellon University, an M.S. in Information Technology - Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, as well as a Masters in Business Administration from Johns Hopkins University. His approach to personal finance is that of an engineer, breaking down complex subjects into bite-sized easily understood concepts that you can use in your daily life.

One of his favorite tools (here's my treasure chest of tools,, everything I use) is Personal Capital, which enables him to manage his finances in just 15-minutes each month. They also offer financial planning, such as a Retirement Planning Tool that can tell you if you're on track to retire when you want. It's free.

He is also diversifying his investment portfolio by adding a little bit of real estate. But not rental homes, because he doesn't want a second job, it's diversified small investments in a few commercial properties and a farm in Illinois via AcreTrader.

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