Jim Wang

Jim Wang

Jim Wang is a thirty-something father of three who is a frequent contributor to Forbes and Vanguard’s Blog. He has also been fortunate to have appeared in the New York Times, Baltimore Sun, Entrepreneur, and Marketplace Money.

Jim has a B.S. in Computer Science and Economics from Carnegie Mellon University, an M.S. in Information Technology – Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, as well as a Masters in Business Administration from Johns Hopkins University. His approach to personal finance is that of an engineer, breaking down complex subjects into bite-sized easily understood concepts that you can use in your daily life.

One of his favorite tools (here’s my treasure chest of tools,, everything I use) is Personal Capital, which enables him to manage his finances in just 15-minutes each month. They also offer financial planning, such as a Retirement Planning Tool that can tell you if you’re on track to retire when you want. It’s free.

He is also diversifying his investment portfolio by adding a little bit of real estate. But not rental homes, because he doesn’t want a second job, it’s diversified small investments in a few commercial properties and a farm in Illinois via AcreTrader.

Recent Articles by Jim

How to Invest in Farmland

When it comes to investing, the two most popular options are the stock market and real estate. Within each, there…

5 Best Robinhood Brokerage App Alternatives

If you're looking for an alternative brokerage to Robinhood, we put together a list of brokers that offer free trades, no minimums, no account fees, and (preferably) a new account bonus.

How Are Dividends Taxed?

There are two types of dividends - ordinary and qualified. Ordinary dividends are taxed like income. Qualified dividends are taxed as long term capital gains. The rate you pay for long term capital gains depends on your income but will be between 0 and 20%.

What You Should Do With All the Financial Advice on the Internet

The internet is a great place to get new ideas and opinions you hadn't considered you can't blindly follow the advice. Your finances are too important to leave to internet articles written by unknown people. Instead, follow a variety of bloggers, bounce new ideas off a trusted source, and verify your decisions with a fee-only financial planner when you can.

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