Where Are the Best Places to Sell Used DVDs?

Do you have a cabinet full of DVDs you’re looking to get rid of? With streaming services like Netflix and Disney+ so readily available, more and more people are getting rid of their DVD movie media collections.

If you’re one of them, you may wonder where you can sell your old DVDs. The short answer is that there are several places, and I’ve included some of the best in the list below.

Table of Contents
  1. 10 Best Places to Sell Used DVDs
    1. 1. Craigslist
    2. 2. eBay
    3. 3. Decluttr
    4. 4. Facebook Marketplace
    5. 5. OfferUp
    6. 6. Amazon
    7. 7. SellBackYourBook.com
    8. 8. FYE
    9. 9. Yard Sales
    10. 10. Local Resellers
  2. Final Thoughts

10 Best Places to Sell Used DVDs

The best marketplaces will help you sell your DVDs quickly and at a fair price. Some of these are fairly obvious, while others you may not have thought of.

1. Craigslist

craigslist logo

Best feature: No fees

Founded in 1995, Craigslist remains a tried and true source to sell just about anything. With billions of monthly page views, you’re sure to find an audience for your DVDs, no matter the genre.

And while Craigslist focuses on local sales, you do have the option to list on any Craigslist area site. This can be helpful when selling easy-to-ship products like DVDs as it will expand your viewership.

Best of all, Craigslist doesn’t charge selling fees. However, a downside is that it doesn’t offer much in the way of security, and it doesn’t screen users. This causes an increase in the amount of fraudulent activity on the site.

As a result, be sure to practice common safety rules when buying and selling online:

  • Meet in a public place
  • Tell someone where you’re going
  • Only take cash or an appropriate trade
  • Don’t fall for common buy/sell site scams
  • Go with your gut if something feels off

To increase your chances of success, take great pictures of your items and be honest about the condition of your DVDs. If there are cracks in the case or scratches on the DVD, be sure to note that on your listing. 

2. eBay

ebay logo

Best feature: Worldwide audience

eBay is another long-standing online marketplace that benefits from a massive audience. With over 130 million active buyers at any given time, you’re almost sure to find a buyer for your used DVDs.

And while Craigslist users have to search individual cities’ sites, eBay listings reach across the world with just one search. 

You can also narrow your search when buying on eBay to only include listings in your local area, but most buyers will search eBay as a whole, especially if it’s an item that ships easily, like DVDs. 

The biggest downside to eBay is the fee structure. You’ll pay roughly 15% of your sale price for each DVD you sell. And you won’t get help with your listing like you do when you list through online consignment shops

When you pay fees on eBay, you’re paying for the ability to reach a huge audience. It may just help you sell your items fast. 

3. Decluttr

decluttr logo

Best feature: Immediate offer

Decluttr is an online marketplace for used items, including phones, DVDs, CDs, gaming consoles and games, and more. 

The site was launched in 2013 and has long been known as a trusted site for buying and selling. Where does Decluttr get the items it sells? From individual sellers like yourself. 

Decluttr has made the selling process quite easy. All you have to do as a seller is enter the barcode from your DVD into Decluttr’s selling page. 

Once you enter the barcode, you’ll get an immediate offer for your DVD. You can take or leave the offer, of course.

If you accept their offer, Decluttr will send you a free shipping label. You can then box up the DVDs you’ve sold to them, place the free shipping label on your box and send them off to Decluttr. 

Once received, Decluttr will assess your DVDs to be sure they’re in the condition you stated. Once they’ve assured you all is well with your shipment, they’ll pay you for the DVDs.

Payment can be made via PayPal, via Direct Deposit to your bank account, or you can donate the proceeds to charity. 

Similar to a pawn shop, you won’t get top dollar for DVDs you sell on Declutter. However, they offer a fast, easy way for you to sell your DVDs and earn some cash. 

4. Facebook Marketplace

facebook marketplace logo

Best feature: Local and non-local popularity

Facebook boasts nearly 3 billion users. And while not all of those users browse Facebook Marketplace, you can bet your money that a good portion of them do. 

And besides reaching both local and non-local potential customers, you won’t pay a fee for selling used DVDs on Facebook Marketplace. 

Marketplace does have some safety guidelines in place, the main one being that you can see the profiles of users. It gives you some idea of whom you’re dealing with when you sell or buy on Marketplace. 

Also, Facebook Marketplace’s user-friendly interface lets you create a listing within a minute or two. If you use Facebook regularly, using Facebook Marketplace to sell your DVDs might be well worth your time. 

5. OfferUp

offerup logo

Best feature: Safety tools

OfferUp is fast catching up with local buy/sell sites such as Facebook and Craigslist. With an estimated 56 million annual buyers and sellers, the site is definitely one of the go-to places for selling used DVDs and everything else.

Among its top features, you’ll find:

  • Front page photos of items for sale
  • A user-friendly website and app
  • Instant messaging between users
  • The ability to post an ad in less than 30 seconds

One of the top reasons OfferUp is gaining in popularity is its safety features. When you visit OfferUp to buy or sell, you’ll find that every user has to create a user profile. 

The user profile includes a photo, a rating, transaction history, etc. The site also features MeetUp Spots, which are police stations and businesses the app has partnered with for safer meetings between buyers and sellers. 

And, like Craigslist, you won’t pay a dime to sell your DVDs on OfferUp unless you choose to pay to ship your DVDs to a customer.

6. Amazon

amazon logo

Best feature: Massive viewership

With over 300 million active customer accounts, Amazon can be another great place to sell used DVDs. 

You will pay $0.99 cents plus 15% for every DVD you sell on Amazon. However, you may find that the number of customers you reach makes the fees well worth it. 

One downside is that due to Amazon’s popularity (they have over twice the active buyers as eBay), your listing may get lost in the abyss of other listings on Amazon

In other words, the sheer amount of users Amazon has can make it hard for buyers to find your product unless you’re selling something that’s very rare. If you’re selling movies that a lot of people own, the competition might be too high.

Hint: Amazon’s e-commerce selling program might be a good option if you have a lot of DVDs (or other items) to sell. For $40 a month, you can get access to a host of business tools to help sell your items faster, create bulk listings and more. 

You still have to pay the 15% selling fee with an e-commerce plan, but you can sell other items too and get additional help as you sell.  

7. SellBackYourBook.com

sellbackyourbook.com logo

Best feature: Their best price promise.

SellBackYourBook.com works a lot like Decluttr. You enter the barcode of your DVD and get an immediate quote.

If you accept the price quote they’ll send you a free shipping label. You box up your DVDs, affix the free shipping label and send the DVDs on their way.

As with Decluttr, there is an inspection process your DVDs must go through after they arrive at the warehouse. 

Once they’re approved, you are issued payment. SellBackYourBook.com promises the best price for DVDs, compared to similar sites like Decluttr. 

You’ll be paid within three days of your shipment being approved. Note that, as the name indicates, the site also buys and sells books of almost any kind. 

8. FYE

FYE logo

FYE will accept used DVDs and pay you for them. Note that the FYE website will sometimes accept used DVDs for sale on the website, similar to how Decluttr does.

However, FYE won’t accept all DVDs on its website, and instead requires you to go into a physical store location. 

FYE has over 200 locations in roughly 40 U.S. states. So while you won’t find an FYE store in every state, you will find one in most states. 

When you sell used DVDs to FYE, you can expect more money if your DVDs are in good condition with cases that are uncracked and with no stickers on the cases. 

If your DVD cases are cracked, missing original artwork or have stickers or other foreign objects on them, FYE may not accept them for sale.  

Before you visit an FYE location to sell your used DVDs, I recommend that you call the location first to find out if they accept used DVDs and the best hours to visit.

That way you know when to come in so you can be sure there’s staff available that is authorized to assess your items and offer payment.

9. Yard Sales

Best feature: Community interaction

Consider holding a yard sale to sell your DVDs. One advantage is that you can sell other items you’re looking to get rid of as well. 

Increase visitors to your yard sale by scheduling it in tandem with community sales if your city has one. You could also put together a neighborhood sale with several of your neighbors.

If neither of those options are available, try to host a multi-family sale at your place by inviting family members and friends to participate. 

To sell your DVDs and other items quickly, be sure your yard sale is organized and that items are priced attractively. Advertise your yard sale on social media sites and share the sale info with family and friends as well. 

Give your sale an extra “oomph” by selling baked goods, candy, lemonade or hot dogs. 

10. Local Resellers

Best feature: Hands-off selling

Check with local resellers to sell your used DVDs. You might find a consignment shop in your area that will sell your DVDs on consignment. 

Or, you could bring your DVDs into a store like Half Price Books. Half Price Books buys books, DVDs, CDs, video games and more and gives you cash on the spot. 

Check out the Half Price Books website for more details. Note that if you sell to Half Price Books you should expect to show a government-issued ID of some sort. This rule is in place to help the company avoid taking in stolen goods.

Another option? Sell to local pawn shops in your area. Like Half Price Books, pawn shops will give you an immediate offer for the DVDs you want to sell. 

If you accept the offer, they’ll pay you cash and you can be on your way. The one downside to selling to a local reseller is that, like Decluttr, you won’t get the highest offer on the items you sell. 

You will, however, get an immediate sale if they accept the titles you’re selling, so you can make some quick and easy cash. 

Final Thoughts

The best places to sell used DVDs are the places that best help you meet your selling goals. Whether that is to make the most money, declutter quickly or have a chance to meet community members as you sell, you’ve got many choices for selling those DVDs.

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About Laurie Blank

Laurie Blank is a blogger, freelance writer, and mother of four. She’s psyched about teaching others how to manage their money in a way that aligns with their values and has been quoted in Bankrate.

She's a licensed Realtor with Edina Realty in Minneapolis, Minnesota (also licensed in Wisconsin too) and has been freelance writing for over six years.

She shares powerful insights on her blog, Great Passive Income Ideas, that will show you how you can create passive income sources of your own.

Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, not those of any bank or financial institution. This content has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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